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2016: The year in review

The dawn of 2016 seemingly heralded a new age of intelligent autonomous systems. The Tesla Autopilot was launched in October 2015, surprising us by its maturity. Suddenly, the writing was on the wall: automobiles driven by humans would eventually go the way of horse-drawn carriages. We techies were wide-eyed at the implications.

Changing image of offshoring: The dice has been rolled

Let’s say that you have to start a large software project and are willing to invest in 15 experts. You will quickly realize, that the onboarding phase is the moment of truth – and the truth is, we have a serious capacity problem in Austria.

Innovation - It’s systemic, we must never let it happen again

The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization by MIT’s Peter Senge was a seminal book on systems thinking, at the core of which was the premise that if you have good people with a bad system, the system will win almost every time.

127 ft. deep with Globalization

Despite the spread of English through economic globalization, not all users of software speak English. Even though English is largely a second language throughout the world, neither all speakers are able to use the language efficiently in their work, nor everyone prefer having to use English to accomplish their daily tasks; this is particularly true at the end user level. In other words, national language identity is very much alive all across, for very practical reasons.

Nagarro-NetEnt partnership ushers in a new era in the gaming industry

Just over a year ago when NetEnt started using HTML5 for development, Nagarro was central to their strategy. Today, Nagarro’s Gurgaon office in India is one of the major development centers for them.

Journey to the center of innovation

“Innovation is not a single action but a total process of interrelated sub processes. It is not just the conception of a new idea, nor the invention of a new device, nor the development of a new market. The process is all these things acting in an integrated fashion.” Paul Trott

Global experience that was the best preparation for working life

Sonia Sanghera (24), a student at KTH received both mentoring and valuable hands-on experience working in a global organization.

Microservices: Revisiting Conway's Law

Conway’s Law applies to modular software systems and states that: "Any organization that designs a system (defined more broadly here than just information systems) will inevitably produce a design whose structure is a copy of the organization’s communication structure". Conway’s Law was brought to my attention a few years ago whilst in dialogue with a major Swiss Investment Bank, who were referencing this as a limitation on their ability to build software products. Intuitively, I could see that this might not be such a good thing, but Melvin Conway came up with this in the 60’s right and it wasn't like this could be all that bad, could it? So with a certain curiosity I engaged in a conversation to better understand these concerns. What I discovered was that it's more like “a software system whose structure closely matches its organization’s communication structure works better (defined broadly) than a system whose structure differs from its organization’s communication structure”. “Better” in this context means higher productivity for the people developing and maintaining the system, through more efficient communication and coordination, and higher quality. All of a sudden what previously seemed intuitively to make sense was now clearly making sense - productivity and quality being both tangible and desirable.

Web Insecurity

We need to adopt more rigorous engineering principles, adapting the principles of concurrent engineering, to place security at the core of our appropriately engineered product solutions.

The ultimate racing experience at the Grand Canyon

“I have learned that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.” - Henry David Thoreau